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Differential expression of estrogen receptor α and progesterone receptor in the normal and cryptorchid testis of a dog

Abstract

Descending of the testes is an important process for spermatogenesis and cryptorchidism is one of the most relevant genital defects in dogs. In a previous study, we observed abnormal morphology and proliferation of Sertoli cells in a cryptorchid testis. In the present study, we investigated the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the normal and cryptorchid testis of a dog. Elective orchidectomy was performed on the dog’s abdominal right testis (undescended, cryptorchid) and scrotal left testis (descended, normal). In the normal testis, estrogen receptor a immunoreactivity was detected in Leydig cells alone, while estrogen receptor a immunoreactivity in the cryptorchid testis was significantly prominent in the Sertoli cells as well. In addition, progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in the control testis was detected in the spermatids, but was not detected in the cryptorchid testis. This result suggests that unilateral cryptorchidism causes increases of estrogen receptor a expression in Sertoli cells.

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Correspondence to Goo Jang or In Koo Hwang.

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This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (https://doi.org/creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Jung, H.Y., Yoo, D.Y., Jo, Y.K. et al. Differential expression of estrogen receptor α and progesterone receptor in the normal and cryptorchid testis of a dog. Lab Anim Res 32, 128–132 (2016). https://doi.org/10.5625/lar.2016.32.2.128

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Keywords

  • Dog
  • estrogen receptor α
  • progesterone receptor
  • Sertoli cells
  • unilateral cryptorchidism