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Mouse Cre-LoxP system: general principles to determine tissue-specific roles of target genes

Abstract

Genetically engineered mouse models are commonly preferred for studying the human disease due to genetic and pathophysiological similarities between mice and humans. In particular, Cre-loxP system is widely used as an integral experimental tool for generating the conditional. This system has enabled researchers to investigate genes of interest in a tissue/cell (spatial control) and/or time (temporal control) specific manner. A various tissue-specific Cre-driver mouse lines have been generated to date, and new Cre lines are still being developed. This review provides a brief overview of Cre-loxP system and a few commonly used promoters for expression of tissue-specific Cre recombinase. Also, we finally introduce some available links to the Web sites that provides detailed information about Cre mouse lines including their characterization.

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Correspondence to Sun-Kyoung Im or Sungsoon Fang.

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Kim, H., Kim, M., Im, S. et al. Mouse Cre-LoxP system: general principles to determine tissue-specific roles of target genes. Lab Anim Res 34, 147–159 (2018). https://doi.org/10.5625/lar.2018.34.4.147

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Keywords

  • Cre-loxP system
  • tissue specific promoter
  • Cre portal sites